Election Results 2014

Election Results 2014

One way of using this Page: 1) write a letter advocating a more rational drug policy. 2) look up the names of your “leaders” using the Secretary of State’s “Election Information” tool. 3) Note the name of your District. 4) Then check this page and see if the voters of your District have endorsed the policy you are advocating. 5) If so, point this out. Emphatically. (Note, however, that there was a redestricting after the 2000 election. Some cities and towns might no longer be in the District that voted on a given PPQ. However it is unlikely that the entire political character of the District will have changed. And remember — you are writing as a constituent and have slack coming for that reason alone.)

 ELECTION 2014 PROVED TO BE HIGH-LY FOCUSED ON MARIJUANA REFORM!

Voters in Oregon, Alaska, California, New Mexico, Massachusetts, Michigan, Washington D.C., and Guam all voted YES for some type of marijuana policy reform.

Legalization, decriminalization, medical marijuana and more marijuana laws were reformed across the country thanks to voters turning out in HIGH numbers and voting!

Despite one crushing loss for medical marijuana in Florida, all in all it was a very successful campaign for cannabis, this election brought marijuana to mainstream politics across the country.  Politicians are being pressed on their stance on legalizing marijuana, as voter turn out proves that more than 50% of the country is ready to legalize marijuana for all.

See the details below.

Image source mpp.org

Image source mpp.org

On November 4, 2014, Massachusetts voters in selected districts had a chance to weigh in on marijuana policy by responding to non-binding questions appearing on Election Day ballots.

One Public Policy Question (PPQ), sponsored by the Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts, appeared on ballots in eight districts and asked if the state representative from that district should be instructed to support a measure regulating marijuana similar to how alcohol is regulated:
“Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?”

A second PPQ, sponsored by Bay State Repeal, appeared on ballots in six districts and asked what should replace marijuana prohibition after its repeal:
“Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.”

See the table below for more information on the measures.

 

District/Question Number

Question

Sponsor

Results

4th Barnstable

Question 6
in Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans, Chatham, Harwich, and Precinct 3 of BrewsterQuestion 9 in Orleans
“Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
73%
(results incomplete)
4th BerkshireQuestion 5 in Lenox, Lee, Great Barrington, Stockbridge, Alford, Becket, Egremont, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Marlborough, Richmond, Sandisfield, Sheffield, Tyringham, Washington, West Stockbridge, Blandford, Russell, and Tolland
Question 6 in Otis
“Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
74%
(results incomplete)
1st EssexQuestion 5 in Newburyport, Salisbury, and Amesbury “Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
72%
2nd FranklinQuestion 5 in Athol, Petersham, Phillipston, and precinct A of Belchertown
Question 6 in Erving, Gill, New Salem, Orange, Warwick, and Wendell
Question 7 in Royalston and Templeton
“Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
69%
14th MiddlesexQuestion 5 in Concord, Carlisle, Precincts 1, 2, and 6 of Acton, Precincts 1 and 9 of Chelmsford “Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
72%
(results incomplete)
15th Middlesex

Question 5 in Lexington
Question 6 in Wards 1 and 7 of Woburn
“Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
72%
24th MiddlesexQuestion 5 in Belmont, Ward 11, Precincts 1 and 3 of CambridgeQuestion 6 in Precincts 2, 4, 8, 10, and 12 of Arlington “Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
74%
8th NorfolkQuestion 6 in Sharon, Precinct 4 of Mansfield, Precincts 2, 3, 4, and 6 of StoughtonQuestion 7 in Precincts 3 and 4 of Walpole “Shall the State Representative from this district be instructed to vote in favor of legislation that would allow the state to regulate and tax marijuana in the same manner as alcohol?” Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts WIN
73%
4th Essex House DistrictQuestion 5 in Hamilton, Ipswich, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Rowley, Topsfield, and Wenham Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.” Bay State Repeal WIN
54%
7th Essex House DistrictQuestion 5 in Salem Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.” Bay State Repeal WIN
61%
8th Essex House DistrictQuestion 5 inPrecinct 4 of Ward 3, and Precinct 4 of Ward 4, of Lynn, and MarbleheadQuestion 6 in Swampscott Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.” Bay State Repeal WIN
57%
3rd Middlesex House DistrictQuestion 5 in Hudson, Maynard, Stow, and Bolton Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.” Bay State Repeal WIN
60%
6th Middlesex House DistrictQuestion 5 in Framingham: Precincts 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 15 Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to the cultivation and sale of fruits, vegetables and herbs.” Bay State Repeal WIN
62%
2nd Hampshire House DistrictQuestion 5 in Easthampton, Granby: Precinct 2Question 6 in Hadley and South Hadley Polls public opinion on “replac[ing] the state’s restrictions on marijuana with a law that regulates the cultivation of and commerce in marijuana, by persons over the age of 21, in the same manner as laws that apply to retail and agricultural businesses.” Bay State Repeal WIN
64%

http://www.mpp.org/states/massachusetts/2014-massachusetts-public.html

Which of the questions do you think has the better chance of passing in 2016? Tell us!
Help us #legalizema2016!
www.masscann.org

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NORML launched a excellent campaign for voters to #smokethevote Image by NORML.org http://norml.org/about/smoke-the-vote

NORML launched a excellent campaign for voters to #smokethevote
Image by NORML.org
http://norml.org/about/smoke-the-vote

State, Local Marijuana Legalization Measures Win Big On Election Day
by Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director

Oregon and Alaska legalized and regulated the commercial production and sale of marijuana for adults, while voters residing in the nation’s capitol and in numerous other cities nationwide similarly decided this Election Day to eliminate marijuana possession penalties.

Voters in two states decided in favor of a pair of statewide measures to regulate the commercial production, retail sale, and personal use of marijuana by adults. Alaska and Oregon are the third and fourth states to enact regulations on the licensed production and sale of cannabis, joining Colorado and Washington. All four states have enacted their marijuana legalization laws via voter initiative.

Commenting on the new laws’ passage, NORML Deputy Director Paul Armentano said: “The majority of voters in these states, like a majority of voters nationwide, agree that a pragmatic regulatory framework that allows for the legal, licensed commercial production and retail sale of cannabis to adults best reduces the risks associated with the plant’s use or potential abuse. Elected officials in Alaska, Oregon, and elsewhere should welcome the opportunity to bring these common sense and long overdue regulatory controls to the commercial cannabis market.”

Under the new Oregon proposal (Measure 91), adults who engage in the non-commercial cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis for personal use (up to four marijuana plants and eight ounces of usable marijuana at a given time) will not be subject to taxation or commercial regulations. Imposition of the new law will not “amend or affect in any way the function, duties, and powers of the Oregon Health Authority under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act.” The legalization measure takes effect on July 1, 2015.

Under the Alaska measure (Ballot Measure 2), the adult possession of up to one ounce of cannabis as well as the cultivation of up to six-plants for personal consumption will be legal and untaxed. Commercial production and retail sales of cannabis will be subject to licensing and taxation. Since 1975, Alaskans have enjoyed personal privacy protections allowing for the possession and cultivation of small quantities of cannabis. However, state law has never before permitted a legal market for marijuana production and sales. The initiative becomes law 90 days after the election is certified, which is expected to be in late November.

Some 56 percent of Oregon voters backed Measure 91 while 52 percent of Alaskans endorsed Measure 2.

In California, nearly 60 percent of voters backed Proposition 47, which defelonizes simple drug possession crimes, such as the possession of hashish. Under the measure, Californians with felony records for certain marijuana possession offenses will also be eligible to have their records expunged. Those serving time for felony drug offenses will also be able to petition for resentencing.

In the US territory Guam , 56 percent of voters decided in favor of Proposal 14A, the Compassionate Cannabis Use Act. The new law directs “the Department of Public Health and Social Services to regulate the use of marijuana as treatment for medical conditions.” The Department has up to nine months to provide rules for the territory’s medical marijuana program.

By contrast, a proposed Florida amendment (Amendment 2) fell shy of the 60 percent support threshold necessary in that state to amend the state’s constitution. Fifty-eight percent of Florida voters endorsed the measure, including supermajorities in most every age group except for those voters age 65 and older. Said NORML’s Deputy Director: “This vote wasn’t a rejection of medical marijuana in Florida, but rather an affirmation that most Floridians want patient access to cannabis therapy. NORML hopes that the Florida lawmakers will hear this message loud and clear and take action in 2015 on behalf of the will of the majority of the electorate.”

Municipal voters overwhelmingly decided in favor of depenalizing cannabis on Election Day. In Washington, DC, some 70 percent of District voters approved Initiative 71, which removes criminal and civil penalties regarding the adult possession of up to two ounces of cannabis and/or the cultivation of up to six plants. Adults who engage in not-for-profit transactions of small quantities of cannabis or who possess marijuana-related paraphernalia are also no longer be subject to penalty under this act.

Unlike legalization measures in Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington, I-71 does not establish a regulatory framework for the regulation of a commercial cannabis market. However, members of the DC City Council are currently considering separate legislation to regulate the commercial production and sale of marijuana to adults. (Because Washington, DC does not possess statehood, all District laws are subject to Congressional approval prior to their implementation.)

Voters in several Michigan cities, including Saginaw (population 51,000), Port Huron (30,000), and Berkley (15,000) also decided in favor of local ballot measures depenalizing offenses involving the adult possession of up to one ounce of marijuana. Michigan lawmakers are anticipated to debate a statewide decriminalization proposal in 2015.

Likewise, voters in South Portland, Maine approved a municipal ordinance eliminating local penalties in regard to the adult possession of up to one ounce of cannabis. Voters in Lewiston, Maine rejected a similar measure.

In New Mexico, voters in Bernalillo and Santa Fe counties decided in favor of advisory questions in support of the decriminalization of one ounce or less of marijuana at a city, county and state level. Bernalillo and Santa Fe counties represent a third of the state’s population.

Finally, in Massachusetts, voters in several state representative districts voted in favor of various nonbinding public policy questions calling on state officials to legalize and regulate cannabis-related commerce.
- See more at: http://blog.norml.org/2014/11/05/state-local-marijuana-legalization-measures-win-big-on-election-day/#sthash.ajqz22br.dpuf

 

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See the ballot initiatives in more detail thanks to Marijuana Policy Project:

http://www.mpp.org/legislation/2014-Ballot-Initiatives.html

Statewide Initiatives

State Initiative Sponsored by Results
Alaska Ballot Measure 2: An initiative to legalize and regulate marijuana similarly to alcohol for those 21 and older; also allows home cultivation
Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol
WIN
52-48
Florida Amendment 2: A constitutional amendment to allow patients with debilitating medical conditions to use marijuana and to obtain it from regulated dispensaries; required 60% to pass United for Care
LOSS
58-42
(required 60% to pass)
Oregon Measure 91: An initiative to legalize and regulate marijuana similarly to alcohol for those 21 and older; also allows home cultivation

Vote Yes on 91, the 2014 Campaign to Legalize, Regulate, and Tax Marijuana in Oregon

WIN
55-45

 

U.S. Territory/Federal District Measures

U.S. Territory/Federal District
Initiative Sponsored by Results
Guam Proposal 14A, Joaquin (KC) Concepcion II Compassionate Cannabis Use Act of 2013: Guam’s legislature placed this measure on the ballot to allow voters to decide whether to allow patients with debilitating medical conditions to use marijuana and to obtain it from regulated providers. Referendum submitted by the Guam Legislature
WIN
56-44
Washington, D.C.
Initiative 71: An initiative to make it legal for adults to possess and grow limited amounts of marijuana DC Cannabis Campaign WIN
69-31

 

Local Measures

Local
Initiative Sponsored by Results
California Numerous local ballot initiatives appeared on city and county ballots across the state. Most were aimed at improving local regulations, but some presented by local government officials would restrict medical marijuana-related activity. Many grassroots organizations Click here for results.
Colorado A number of local measures asked voters whether to allow or ban adult-use marijuana stores in their county, city, or town. In addition, several Colorado localities had marijuana tax issues on the ballot. Various local campaigns Click here for results.
Maine Local measures in Lewiston (Question 2) and South Portland would make possession of up to one ounce of marijuana legal for adults 21 years of age or older. They also expressed support for regulating marijuana like alcohol at the state level. Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol in Maine
Lewiston: LOSS
45-55
South Portland:
WIN
52-48
Massachusetts Non-binding marijuana policy questions (Public Policy Questions, or PPQs) appeared on ballots in selected districts across Massachusetts. Drug Policy Forum of Massachusetts and Bay State Repeal
Click here for results.
Michigan Eleven local decriminalization measures appeared on city ballots across Michigan. Safer Michigan Coalition Click here for results.
New Mexico
Non-binding questions on decriminalization appeared on the ballots in Bernalillo and Santa Fe Counties. DecrimNM Bernalillo County:
WIN
57-42Santa Fe County:
WIN
73-27

http://www.mpp.org/legislation/2014-Ballot-Initiatives.html

 

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